A Way of Being Free by Ben Okri

A Way of Being Free

We began before words, and we will end beyond them.

It sometimes seems to me that our days are poisoned with too many words. Words said and not meant. Words said and meant. Words divorced from feeling. Wounding words. Words that conceal. Words that reduce. Dead words.

If only words were a kind of fluid that collects in the ears, if only they turned into the visible chemical equivalent of their true value, an acid, or something curative – then we might be more careful. Words do collect in us anyway. They collect in the blood, in the soul, and either transform or poison people’s lives. Bitter or thoughtless words poured into the ears of the young have blighted many lives in advance. We all know people whose unhappy lives twist on a set of words uttered to them on a certain unforgotten day at school, in childhood, or at university.

We seem to think that words aren’t things. A bump on the head may pass away, but a cutting remark grows with the mind. But then it is possible that we know all too well the awesome power of words – which is why we use them with such deadly and accurate cruelty.

We are all wounded inside in some way or other. We all carry unhappiness within us for some reason or other. Which is why we need a little gentleness and healing from one another. Healing in words, and healing beyond words. Like gestures. Warm gestures. Like friendship, which will always be a mystery. Like a smile, which someone described as the shortest distance between two people.

Yes, the highest things are beyond words.

That is probably why all art aspires to the condition of word­lessness. When literature works on you, it does so in silence, in your dreams, in your wordless moments. Good words enter you and become moods, become the quiet fabric of your being. Like music, like painting, literature too wants to transcend its primary condition and become something higher. Art wants to move into silence, into the emotional and spiritual conditions of the world. Statues become melodies, melodies become yearnings, yearnings become actions.

When things fall into words they usually descend. Words have an earthly gravity. But the best things in us are those that escape the gravity of our deaths. Art wants to pass into life, to lift it; art wants to enchant, to transform, to make life more meaningful or bearable in its own small and mysterious way. The greatest art was probably born from a profound and terrible silence -a silence out of which the deepest enigmas of our lives cry: why are we here? What is the point of it all? How can we know peace and live in joy? Why be born in order to die? Why this difficult one-way journey between the two mysteries?

Out of the wonder and agony of being come these cries and questions and the endless stream of words with which to order human life and quieten the human heart in the midst of our living and our distress.

The ages have been inundated with vast oceans of words. We have been virtually drowned in them. Words pour at us from every angle or corner. They have not brought understanding, or peace, or healing, or a sense of self-mastery, nor has the ocean of words given us the feeling that, at least in terms of tranquillity, the human spirit is getting better.

At best our cry for meaning, for serenity, is answered by a greater silence, the silence that makes us seek higher recon­ciliation.

I think we need more of the wordless in our lives. We need more stillness, more of a sense of wonder, a feeling for the mystery of life. We need more love, more silence, more deep listening, more deep giving.

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International Fiction

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Speaking Tiger News

“Translation as Adventure, Obsession and Collaboration”

Join us for this week’s #TranslationThursdays session with Sampurna Chattarji, poet, novelist, teacher and translator par excellence. She has eighteen published books to her credit. Her translation of Joy Goswami’s Selected Poems is a Harper Perennial; and Wordygurdyboom! – her translation of Sukumar Ray – is a Puffin Classic. She is currently Poetry Editor of The Indian Quarterly. (more…)

#TranslationThursdays

“Announcing this week’s #TranslationThursdays session with Arunava Sinha, award-winning translator and Associate Professor of Creative Writing, Ashoka University. Arunava Sinha translates classic, modern and contemporary Bengali fiction and nonfiction into English, and from English into Bengali.

Participate in the session and find out how Arunava began his translation journey, as he speaks about “My First Translation”. If you’re looking for some inspiration this week, this is it.

Registration link: https://forms.gle/ToSuqs9nfVKnSSBP9

Thank you, and see you there!


#FUNtasticBookWeekends continues at Storyteller Bookstore!
This Sunday come spend time with Shabnam Minwalla as she does a dramatised book reading of her own book, Nimmi’s Bizuper Birthday.
The book is about Nimmi who is waiting for her birthday and is excited about a new mobile phone, and a party. Of course, it all comes with some disastrous issues including a competition birthday party by someone else! This will be followed by a word game!
5:30 PM onwards this Sunday, register here to attend the session – https://tinyurl.com/y7cp9gha
Powered by Talking Cub / Storyteller Bookstore/ LBB, Kolkata

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